The frustration of Worldfarm One

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Worldfarm OneWhen I wrote Worldfarm One, I expected parts of it would be controversial. I was writing about a time in the not-so-far future when the United States was no longer the superpower it once was; and its population was emigrating to other lands for better lives and jobs, only to be looked down upon by the nations they emigrated to.  It should not only sound familiar, but it should set off whatever irony alarms the reader has at their disposal.  I expected that some people—well, let’s be clear, U.S. citizens—would not be thrilled with the demotion of the United States on the world stage, and that I’d hear about it fairly quickly.

But owing to the incredible vagaries of life, what I got was almost completely different.  And it boggles my mind, to this day. Continue reading

Encouragement and Zen

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Steven Lyle JordanI recently heard from a producer with whom I’m collaborating on a possible television vehicle, who told me he’d heard from an actress who had been a major character in the original production that inspired this new vehicle—and yes, that’s all you’re getting from me, as the project is still in stealth mode.

Anyway, this actress—I’ll call her M—had a chance to read through the material we’re preparing for the new vehicle, including two short stories of mine, and she reported back to my producer friend that she was left “in tears” over the wonderful treatments and ideas gleaned from the original production, of which she still has very fond memories.  M specifically mentioned my short stories as being among the most moving material she saw. Continue reading

“I’m sorry you have no friends.”

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Steven Lyle Jordan, author and futurist

Steven Lyle Jordan, author and futurist

Years ago, my wife and I bought our house in Maryland. Our real estate agent was a man whom we’d met at a house sale elsewhere, and we liked him so much that we’d asked him to represent us; with his help, we found a great house, and have been more than satisfied with it to this day.

One day, a few months later, we chanced upon him, and after mutual greetings, he said to us: “I’m sorry you have no friends.” It took us a second to realize he was sarcastically referring to his hope that we would have recommended him to our friends in the market for new homes, thereby bringing him fresh business. We didn’t take it personally, of course—and at the time, we didn’t happen to know anyone who was house-hunting, so we couldn’t have helped even if we’d wanted to—but the point was taken. Continue reading