Being more exciting

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cover of The Kestral Voyages: My Life, After BerserkerWhat… me?  Perish the thought.  No, I’m trying to make my books sound more exciting.  I’ve recently edited the blurbs for two of my novels, Sarcology and My Life, After Berserker, to see if a more exciting description will help sales.

This notion came to me after a Facebook discussion with author James Moclair, who met with two prospective customers for his new book… but apparently, the customers were deterred from buying by the fact that he, in his mid-sixties, seemed to them to be “too old to be a science fiction writer.” Continue reading

Desperately seeking futurist SF writers

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Steven Lyle JordanBeing an independent self-published author, I’ve always sought to find other independent authors to enjoy… supporting the fraternity, as it were.  But from the very beginning, I’ve had a problem: I can’t find indie authors, like myself, writing the kind of SF novels that I write and enjoy.  There must be some; I can’t be the only futurist SF writer, or the last futurist writer who’s still independent or self-published.  Where are all my futurist SF writing homeys? Continue reading

I’m ready to replace the word “Computer”

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ENIAC computer viewed through smartphoneOkay, so we’ve reached 2013, firmly embedded in the 21st century, and I say it’s time to address an anachronism in our modern language.  Specifically, a word that needs to be replaced with something better.  A word from the last century that should stay in the 20th century, and needs to be substituted with a 21st century word better suited for our times.  The word is “computer.”

Maybe I really am the only one who thinks the word “computer” belongs in the 20th century, where it was born.  Maybe I’m the only one who thinks the word “computer” does not adequately describe the things our modern devices can do.  Maybe I’m the only one who thinks that using old words can hold us back and make it harder to envision their potential for growth and improvement.

But just in case I’m not… let’s talk. Continue reading

Ebooks: Scarcity, abundance and economy

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A recently revived subject by Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Scarcity and Abundance, examines the ebook industry in terms of the shift from a “scarcity” economy, in which things are valued and priced due to their limited availability, to “abundance,” in which items are available in effectively unlimited supply, turning the old economic model upside-down or destroying it entirely. Continue reading