Nod Gesture Control Ring

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A new dimension in gesture control.

Nod-Gesture-Control-Ring

The new Nod gesture control ring ($150) has been designed to seamlessly transforms your hand movements into commands, allowing you to control devices and applications simply with a wave of your hand. In essence, the ring is an input device, just like a mouse, keyboard, or trackpad. Slip it on your index finger.

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Wave your hand in the air. Swipe your thumb over its touch-control surface. All your gestures and motions can be used to control other consumer electronics. “We want you to be able to address any pixel of the digital world in the real world,” says Anush Elangovan, Nod Labs’ founder and CEO.

The $150 gesture-control ring is packed with an accelerometer, gyroscope, compass and temperature sensor. The ring’s chunky business end responds to capacitive touch. Battery life is rated for 24 hours. There are 12 different band sizes, and Nod is waterproof.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy-Ac9X9oSo&feature=youtu.be

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AIs taking over? What the heck for?

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CybermenOne of the favorite discussions amongst sci-fi fans, scientists, computer experts and roboticists is the idea that artificial intelligence, or AI, will someday become so smart that it will “kill all the humans” and take over the world.  The trope has led to innumerable books, movies, papers, games and debates, and keeps everyone looking sideways at their computers whenever they do something unexpected.  It has arguably become the largest source of mass paranoia in the industrialized world, now surpassing our distrust of government.

And it’s fun to talk about, whether we expect it to happen or not. Continue reading

Relevance in the modern era, with spies… and SF

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scene from Skyfall

Skyfall, courtesy MGM and Columbia Pictures.

The latest James Bond movie, Skyfall, may not be Bond’s sexiest, over-the-top adventure yet, but it might be his most vital: The theme of the movie is relevance… old vs new… and Bond’s place in the post-Cold-War era.  M and MI6 are similarly attacked—literally and, apparently, easily—as the villain applies the latest computer tools to the old-school organization, and brings into question whether or not this stodgy organization, and its spies, can keep up with the modern era. Continue reading